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Plantwise Technical Factsheet

dark-headed striped borer (Chilo polychrysus)

Host plants / species affected
Cyperaceae (Sedges)
Oryza sativa (rice)
Poaceae (grasses)
Saccharum officinarum (sugarcane)
Triticum (wheat)
Zea mays (maize)
List of symptoms/signs
Growing point  -  dead heart
Growing point  -  dwarfing; stunting
Growing point  -  internal feeding; boring
Leaves  -  abnormal forms
Leaves  -  external feeding
Leaves  -  internal feeding
Stems  -  dead heart
Stems  -  internal feeding
Stems  -  stunting or rosetting
Whole plant  -  dead heart
Symptoms
As with other stem borers of rice, the main symptoms caused by C. polychrysus are the appearance of 'dead hearts' and 'white heads' in growing crops, confirmed by dissection of samples of stems to retrieve larvae and pupae and rear adults for identification by specialist taxonomists.
Prevention and control

Control measures used against this species on rice are similar to those used against Chilo suppressalis, which is usually more important, and against other borer species. In Peninsular Malaysia, where C. polychrysus was a major pest before 1960, the introduction of double-cropping with short-maturing rice varieties has reduced its importance (Khoo, 1986).

Impact
Manwan (1977) reported that C. polychrysus was a major pest of rice in Malaysia and parts of India and that its importance was increasingly recognized in some other countries.

Khoo (1986) reported that C. polychrysus had ceased to be a major pest of rice in Peninsular Malaysia since the introduction of double-cropping with short-maturing varieties. Waterhouse (1993), in a review of the major arthropod pests of agriculture in South-East Asia, ranks C. polychrysus as widespread and important in Cambodia and the Philippines (but see under Notes on Taxonomy and Nomenclature) and important locally in Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Malaysia and Indonesia.

C. polychrysus is certainly less widespread and less important than C. suppressalis (Walker).
Related treatment support
Plantwise Factsheets for Farmers
Thailand, Bureau of Rice Research and Development; CABI, Thai language
 
Pest Management Decision Guides
Thailand, Bureau of Rice Research and Development, Rice Department; CABI, 2013, English language
 
External factsheets
IRRI Rice Factsheets: Crop Health, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), English language
IRRI Factsheets, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), English language
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